Frequently Asked Buyer Questions

Buyers Frequently Asked Questions: As a buyer, you have to make sure to know how the market works before you step in, or you risk missing out on the property of your dreams when you find it. Here are the core questions most buyers have. Feel free to send me one of your own. If I’m interested in a property, how can I determine if the list price is fair? How do I know what price to offer for a property? Do I need to have a home inspection done on every home I’m interested in? What happens to my deposit while I await closing? How do I go about finding open houses? Can I get a lockbox key from you and just visit a house myself? What is your referral policy? Should I buy first or sell first? Can you tell me more about bidding wars? Should I buy new or re-sale When should I make my offer conditional Do you know any mortgage brokers or financing specialists How long should a closing take – how soon before I can move in I saw a great house on MLS.ca but when I drove by, it was already sold If I just want to get in to see some houses, why do I need a Buyer Representative Is a Buyer Representative’s service free to me Do I need a real estate lawyer if the offer documents are pretty standard How much do I have to put down on a property when making an offer What are homes selling for on a certain street Offers are being accepted by fax on a property I’m interested in. What does that mean, and how does that affect my chances of getting my dream home What happens if I buy a house and the sellers don’t deliver on their promises Do I get a better deal if I buy a house being sold by the bank What’s a CVA? What is an SPIS? If I’m interested in a property, how can I determine if the list price is fair? I will look at the property’s sales history and comparable recent sales to help assess true market value. How do I know what price to offer for a property?Based on comparable recent sales and my extensive experience, as well as any other relevant factors such as competing offers, I will recommend an offer price that will protect your best interests and give you your best chance to get your dream property. Do I need to have a home inspection done on every home I’m interested in?In some cases, the sellers might already have commissioned a recent home inspection by a reputable home inspector to...

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Tips for Showing a Home Windsor Real Estate

6 Tips to a Great Home Showings When it comes to showing your home to potential home buyers, you want to make sure that they are focused on the home’s potential to become theirs rather than constantly distracting them with outside issues. The following tips will help showings . Home Showing Tip  #1 Dont have Family and friends just hanging out When you decide to sell your home, you really do need to consider how you will show your home. It is definitely unsettling for home buyers to walk through a home only to find that there are kids sleeping in the rooms or someone is frying up a steak as they arrive. A home showing must be treated like a business transaction and in order to drive a sale, you must behave in a professional manner. Ask family members to look after your kids and make sure that the only people in the home are the ones who will be showing it. Home Showing Tip #2 Being Present for Showings You have right to be excited about showing your home to potential hom buyers and you may want to gauge their opinion about your home. But  best if the home owner is not present during showings. If the home owner is home, people often feel rushed and do not give the home enough time. By letting the Realtor handle the showing, it gives the buyer time to look around and discuss the home with their Realtor. Home Showing Tip #3 Knowing  your homes strengths and weaknesses From the moment home buyers walk toward your home, they are searching for flaws and drawbacks, as most skeptics tend to do. I often find it helpful to do a summary of the strengths of a home and show the value of improvements, as well I can often do a cost analysis of any potential weaknesses ie. cost of a new roof or windows.  If a home needs a major repair, it will be obvious to any buyer. Having a quote before hand can often elimante any fears a buyer might have. Home Showing Tip # 4 Removing any Odours Nothing says “don’t buy my house” quite like the smell of wet dog. Add the smell of synthetic roses to the mix, and you might essentially be telling home buyers to run not walk away from your home. As well, cooking before or during a home visit is not appreciated, as no one wants to leave a home smelling like fried food. Boil some cinnamon in water and keep the scent of your home welcoming and delicate rather than invasive. Home Showing Tip #5 Temporary removing pets If possible Pets should not be presetn for showings. If...

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Making a Room Feel Bigger – Windsor Essex Real Estate

Most of us can’t afford a home with massive rooms – not just because the square footage is costly, but also because it would cost an arm and a leg to keep that home heated and comfortable. There are, however, a vast array of tricks and methods that lend themselves to creating an illusion and will help you make a room feel bigger. That said, here are seven ways to make a room feel bigger: Ways to make a room feel bigger #1 Get Roman blinds Window treatment are an important part of making a room feel bigger and using roman blinds instead of curtains takes away that cluttered feeling and the look of extra and unwanted material draped over the living room floor, getting in your way and causing more problems than it’s worth. Ways to make a room feel bigger #2 Use color In terms of illusion, light colors will always make a room seem larger, so try and avoid darker colors when painting the walls, opting instead for a light shade of blue or white. This method will make rooms appear open and airy, and they are also naturally reflective colors, which leads me on to the next point. Ways to make a room feel bigger #3 Opt for natural lighting Letting natural light stream into the room will really open it up, making it feel larger. Make as much use of natural light as possible; add skylights, windows, anything that will open your house up. If this is not possible, then ensure the room is adequately lit as shadows can make a space seem smaller and cramped. Ways to make a room feel bigger #4 Hang mirrors Perhaps an odd choice, the use of mirrors is recommended by experts due to the way it gives the illusion of depth. Place it at a specific point in the room, angle it in a way that is going to ensure maximum depth and it will give you the illusion of more open flow. Like light colors, it can also reflect natural light, and helps brighten up a room. Ways to make a room feel bigger #5 Go for built-ins over closets Instead of moving each bit of furniture back against the wall, a built-in closet enables you to gain extra space and effectively move a lot of your junk out the way by placing it in the wall closet. The extra space built into the closet will have little effect on the size of the room, and means you are effectively not losing any space, but gaining more room to place decorations, mirrors, and anything else you might want. Ways to make a room feel bigger #6...

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What to do when your assessment is too high, Windsor Real Estate

Source MPAC brochure: If you don’t agree with your Property Assessment from MPAC you can file a Request for Reconsideration. The deadline to file your RfR is April 2, 2012. There are two ways to file a RfR: • The preferred method is to submit a RfR form. Request For Reconsideration 2012 Form Forms are available at www.mpac.ca, or call us at 1 866 296-MPAC (6722). You may also choose to file your RfR electronically through AboutMyProperty™ on MPAC’s website. You will be able to attach documents, pictures and reports to accompany your RfR. Your personalized User ID and Password for AboutMyProperty™ are included on your Notice. 1. Write a letter requesting a reconsideration. In your letter, please include the 19-digit roll number on your Notice; your full name, address and phone number; and the reasons why you feel your assessment is not correct, including any information you have to support your claim. 2. File an Appeal with the Assessment Review Board (ARB) You may also choose to file an Appeal with the ARB, an independent tribunal of Ontario’s Ministry of theAttorney General. Residential, Farm and Managed Forest Properties If your property, or a portion of it, is classified as residential, farm or managed forests, you must first file a RfR with MPAC before you are eligible to file an Appeal with the ARB. The classification of your property is indicated on your Notice. If you are required to, or choose to file a RfR first, you have 90 days after MPAC has notified you of its decision on your RfR to file an Appeal with the ARB. The ARB has its own Appeal process. For more information, please contact the ARB at 1 866 448-2248 or 416 212-6349 or visit their website at www.arb.gov.on.ca. To request that your property be eligible for the farm or managed forests classes or conservation land exemption, you must file a RfR with the respective program administrator. For more information, please contact MPAC or visit www.mpac.ca. Other Property Types For any other property types, you can choose to file a RfR with MPAC or file an Appeal with the ARB. The deadline to file your RfR and/or Appeal is April 2, 2012. MPAC’s Role at an ARB Hearing At an ARB hearing, the onus is on MPAC to prove the accuracy of our assessed value. MPAC will present comparable properties as evidence and will share that information with you prior to the hearing. You will also be asked to provide evidence to support your position. Ideally, you should select properties that are most similar to yours (for example, neighbourhood, lot dimensions, living area, age of structure(s) and quality of construction). Please contact MPAC if...

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